Registration

Registration

Course Registration

This is a step-by-step guide to registering for courses at Columbia Bible College:

 

1

COMPLETE THE PRE-REGISTRATION FORM. Each student is required to submit a pre-registration form each semester. Login to MY CBC to access the form.

2

PAY TUTION DEPOSIT. Students can pay their tuition/confirmation deposit online by logging in to their MY CBC account. For more information on the tuition deposit and payment methods available, please refer to Tuition and Fees.

3

SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT. New students will complete course registration with their Admissions Advisor. All returning students must make an appointment with academics through our online scheduling app.

Been away? Students who have been away from Columbia for two semesters or more are required to submit a modified application along with one reference before registering for courses. To re-apply select "re-entry application" on the application form.

Registration Information

Click on the links below for more information.

Course Descriptions

 

Bible & Theology (RELS)

 

 

Down Arrow  100-Level Courses

 

RELS 101 (101Q):
Old Testament Survey

About this Course

This course provides a general introduction to the contents of the Old Testament including some background exploration of geography, social/religious culture, literary conventions, and key issues. The focus, however, is on the overall story—with its theological purpose. In addition, students will gain a basic understanding of the majority of books that make up the Old Testament canon. The ultimate goal is for students to gain familiarity with the Old Testament so that it can be applied to contemporary life.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

RELS 102 (102Q):
New Testament Survey

About this Course

This course provides a general introduction to the contents of the New Testament including some background exploration of geography, social/religious culture, literary conventions, and key issues. Students will gain a basic understanding of the majority of books that make up the New Testament. The ultimate goal is for students to gain familiarity with the New Testament so that it can be applied to contemporary life.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

RELS 121:
Genesis

About this Course

This course develops an understanding and application of the book of Genesis in light of its historical, literary, and cultural context. The course focuses on a literary reading of the narrative with the goal of understanding the emphasis of the larger text and on application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 130:
Psalms

About this Course

This course develops an understanding and application for the book of Psalms in light of its historical, literary, and cultural context. There will be a special emphasis on how the Psalms were used for communal expression and spiritual formation in the context of ancient Israel and on how they can function meaningfully in the contemporary Christian church.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 141:
Gospel of Matthew

About this Course

This course studies Matthew’s Gospel with a view to understanding the background to the book, its theology, and the person, mission, and message of Jesus. The course helps students do a careful literary reading of New Testament narrative texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 142:
Gospel of Mark

About this Course

This course studies Mark’s Gospel with a view to understanding the background to the book, its theology, and the person, mission, and message of Jesus. The course helps students do a careful literary reading of New Testament narrative texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 143:
Gospel of Luke

About this Course

This course studies Luke’s Gospel with a view to understanding the background to the book, its theology, and the person, mission, and message of Jesus. The course helps students do a careful literary reading of New Testament narrative texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 144:
Sermon on the Mount

About this Course

This course is an introduction to the teachings of Jesus through a study of Matthew 5-7 in its literary, historical, and cultural context. Through this study the student will gain an understanding of how to exegete the Gospels and make application in a contemporary context.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 146:
Acts

About this Course

This course studies the book of Acts with a view to understanding the background of the book, its theology, and the key themes. The course helps students do a careful literary reading of New Testament narrative texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 148:
1 Corinthians

About this Course

This course studies the book of I Corinthians in light of its historical, literary, and cultural background. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT letter or epistle especially in light of determining how the themes in this letter speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 149:
Galatians

About this Course

This course studies the book of Galatians in light of its historical, literary, and cultural background. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT letter or epistle especially in light of determining how the themes in this letter speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

RELS 154:
Timothy & Titus

About this Course

This course studies the books of Timothy & Titus in light of their historical, literary, and cultural backgrounds. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT letter or epistle especially in light of determining how the themes in these letters can speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 156Q:
James

About this Course

This course studies the book of James in light of its historical, literary, and cultural background. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT letter or epistle especially in light of determining how the themes in this letter speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: Open to Quest students

  Quest Course

 

RELS 160 (160Q):
Introduction to Christian Theology

About this Course

This course explores the nature and method of theological study and engages with key issues. The course focuses on a survey of Christian teachings—primarily in the evangelical tradition—relating to God, Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit, scripture, salvation, the gospel, humanity, ethics, creation, the church, and the future, in order to help the student understand and articulate their faith within the diverse theological streams of the Christian church.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

RELS 170 (170AQ/BQ):
Spiritual Formation & Discipleship

About this Course

This course encourages spiritual growth and a life of committed discipleship through the study and practice of spiritual disciplines, Christian community, and reflection upon the experience of God. It explores a variety of spiritual disciplines with the understanding that it is through such disciplines that we place ourselves before God and open ourselves up to God’s transforming power to live daily as disciples of Jesus.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

 

 

Down Arrow  200-Level Courses

 

RELS 211:
Biblical Hermeneutics

About this Course

This course introduces the science and art of biblical interpretation known under the more formal title Hermeneutics. The course assists students through the steps in the exegetical process exploring issues such as historical/cultural background, grammar, and literary features/genre in order to better understand the message of the text to its first readers and ultimately how this message can speak cross-culturally to contemporary readers.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Core Course

 

RELS 222:
Exodus

About this Course

This course studies selected portions of the book of Exodus covering both legal and historical material. The focus is on a close reading of the text, exploring the questions that emerge, and on trajectories of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 223:
Joshua & Judges

About this Course

This course introduces Old Testament historical literature and specifically the books of Joshua and Judges. The focus is on a close reading of the narrative texts, exploring the questions that emerge, and on trajectories of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level RELS elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 228:
Ruth & Esther

About this Course

This course studies the books of Ruth and Esther in light of their historical, literary, and cultural contexts. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of OT narrative literature with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 234:
Jeremiah

About this Course

This course introduces Old Testament prophetic literature and specifically the book of Jeremiah. The focus is on understanding how these prophetic texts, meant for a specific historical/cultural context, have enduring meaning to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 201, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 236:
Daniel

About this Course

This course introduces Old Testament prophetic literature and specifically the book of Daniel. The focus is on understanding how these prophetic texts, meant for a specific historical/cultural context, have enduring meaning to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elelctive

  Elective Course

 

RELS 237:
Minor Prophets

About this Course

This course introduces Old Testament prophetic literature and specifically the twelve Minor Prophets. The focus is on understanding how these prophetic texts, meant for specific historical/cultural contexts, have enduring meaning to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 245:
Life of Jesus

About this Course

This course explores the life of Jesus within the world of first-century Judaism. Using the Gospels as the primary source, particular attention is given to the main events of Jesus' life and the ministry of Jesus in word and deed. The course aims to understand the considerable impact Jesus made upon all who encountered him and what this means for all who follow him today.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 250:
Prison Epistles

About this Course

This course studies the books of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon in light of their historical, literary, and cultural background. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT letter or epistle especially in light of determining how the themes in these letters speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

DS-RELS 251:
Phillipans

About this Course

This course studies the book of Philippians in light of its historical, literary, and cultural background. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT letter or epistle especially in light of determining how the themes in this letter speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101 OT Survey, RELS 102 NT Survey, and 3 hours of a 100 Level Bible Elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 259:
Revelation

About this Course

This course studies the book of Revelation in light of its historical, literary, and cultural background. The course helps students gain an understanding of how to exegete the genre of NT apocalyptic literature. The course surveys and evaluates the variety of ways that this book has been used to speak to contemporary issues.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 261:
Peace & Justice Issues

About this Course

This course develops a biblical theology of peace and justice by examining the peace teachings of the Bible and other relevant literature in the context of contemporary situations of violence. It also examines how this theology speaks meaningfully to contemporary issues such as war, ethnic/race relations, gender relations, economic inequality, domestic abuse, international conflict, criminal justice system, and use of power.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 160

  Elective/Social Entrepreneurship Course

 

 

 

RELS 262:
Apologetics

About this Course

This course explores the field of Christian apologetics and develops a basic level of proficiency in its application. Historical, philosophical and cultural perspectives will be employed to respond to positions that refute Christian beliefs. Students develop and practice critical thinking skills and grow in their ability to express logically valid arguments both orally and in writing.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 160

  Elective Course

 

RELS 263:
Themes in Biblical Theology

About this Course

This course is designed to focus on a specific theological theme such as soteriology, pneumatology, and eschatology. Each offering of the course will be focused on only one of these themes, exploring it from a biblical-theological perspective by tracing its development through the Old and New Testaments. The course engages students in a careful reading of the biblical texts, challenging them to think more deeply about their own theology and the way it is applied in daily living.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101, RELS 102, 100-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 264:
Gobal Theologies

About this Course

This course explores theological implications of the demographic shift in Christianity from the West to the Global South. It examines contemporary theological themes and issues from the perspective of different contexts around the world, paying close attention to the ways in which culture, economics, and geography influence our understanding, articulation, and application of theological truth.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 101 OT Survey, RELS 102 NT Survey, and RELS 160 Intro to Christian Theology

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow  300- & 400-Level Courses

 

RELS 301:
Old Testament Theology

About this Course

This course surveys the historical and methodological issues in OT Theology before it launches into the OT as a theological narrative. This study helps the student develop a theological framework for reading the Bible and understanding the foundational themes of such a diverse document as the Old Testament. Students are challenged to reflect on how the Old Testament theological themes inform and shape their theology, faith, life, and ministry.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, HIST 211, 60 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

RELS 302:
New Testament Theology

About this Course

This course surveys the historical and methodological issues in NT Theology before it launches in to an exploration of the key theological themes that emerge in the New Testament. Students are challenged to reflect on how these New Testament theological themes inform and shape their theology, faith, life, and ministry.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, HIST 211, 60 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

RELS 311:
Issues in Hermeneutics

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of hermeneutics providing an overview of various hermeneutical approaches and wrestling with selected key issues such as the role of the reader and the reader’s worldview in interpretation. Students develop skills not only in reading the biblical texts more thoughtfully but also in becoming more critical and perceptive readers of the secondary literature available which reflects on those texts.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, HIST 211, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 322:
Deuteronomy

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of Old Testament law specifically dealing with selected portions of the book of Deuteronomy. While some critical issues are explored, the course focuses on understanding how this book can speak meaningfully to issues Christians wrestle with today. The course helps students engage in a careful literary reading of Old Testament texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 326:
Samuel & Kings

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of Old Testament narrative specifically dealing with selected portions of the books of Samuel and Kings. While some critical issues are explored, the course focuses on understanding how these books can speak meaningfully to issues Christians wrestle with today. The course helps students engage in a careful literary reading of Old Testament narrative texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 329:
Job & Proverbs

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of the books of Job and Proverbs in light of their historical, literary, and cultural contexts. The course provides an introduction to the genre of Wisdom Literature and provides an interpretive framework to deal fairly with these types of books. The course focuses on a literary analysis with the goal of understanding the emphasis of the larger text and on application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 333:
Isaiah

About this Course

This course serves is an advanced study of Old Testament prophetic literature and specifically the book of Isaiah. While some critical issues (authorship, date, historical context) are explored, the course focuses on understanding what these prophetic texts meant for specific historical/cultural contexts and how they can have enduring meaning to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 334:
Ezekiel

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of Old Testament prophetic literature and specifically the book of Ezekiel. While some critical issues (authorship, date, historical context) are explored, the course focuses on understanding what this prophetic text meant for specific historical/cultural contexts and how they can have enduring meaning to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 344:
Gospel of John

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of New Testament gospel narrative specifically dealing with selected portions of the Gospel of John. While some critical issues are explored, the course focuses on understanding how this book provides a significant portrait of Jesus. The course helps students engage in a careful literary reading of New Testament narrative texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 347:
Romans

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of New Testament epistle genre specifically dealing with the Book of Romans. While some critical issues are explored, the course focuses on understanding how this book can speak meaningfully to issues Christians wrestle with today. The course helps students engage in a careful literary reading of New Testament epistle texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 349:
2 Corinthians

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of New Testament epistle genre specifically dealing with the book of Second Corinthians. While some critical issues are explored, the course focuses on understanding how this book can speak meaningfully to issues Christians wrestle with today. The course helps students engage in a careful literary reading of New Testament epistle texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

RELS 355:
Hebrews

About this Course

This course is an advanced study of New Testament epistle genre specifically dealing with the book of Hebrews. While some critical issues are explored, the course focuses on understanding how this book can speak meaningfully to issues Christians wrestle with today. The course helps students engage in a careful literary reading of New Testament epistle texts with the goal of application to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

 

 

RELS 380:
Physical Settings of the Bible

About this Course

This course studies the geography, history, and archaeology of the land of the Bible. Students do extensive map work prior to spending three weeks in classes and fieldtrips in Israel. The goal is to give students a deeper understanding of how the land of the biblical story plays a key role in interpreting the Bible. The course is taught in Israel by Jerusalem University College with which Columbia is an Associated School.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 200-level Bible elective

  Elective Course

 

RELS 460:
Theological Confessions

About this Course

This course enables senior students to synthesize their thinking on issues related to theology, ethics, and spiritual devotion. Students become familiar with a variety of options related to theological/ethical issues and are prepared to express and defend orally and in writing personal convictions in a variety of areas. The course helps students apply their biblical and hermeneutical training to the task of theological confession.

 

Prerequisites: RELS 301, RELS 302 (one of these may be concurrent with RELS 460), 100 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

Christian Ministry

 

 

Down Arrow Church Ministry (CHRM)

 

CHRM 101:
The Church in Mission

About this Course

This course equips students with a foundation for the centrality of the church in the Christian life and exposes students to a variety of church models. This course equips students for engaged participation with the church in the world today. Focused on practical theology and experiential learning, this course centers on engaging a variety of local churches and attending a four-day urban immersion experience of service and learning in Vancouver.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core  Course

 

CHRM 221:
Evangelism

About this Course

This course emphasizes evangelism as a way of life, focusing on the importance of building relationships with a goal of forming Christian community. A primary concern is to understand the gospel, evangelism and life transformation from a biblical perspective. New Testament stories that illustrate the meaning of the gospel, the nature of conversion to Christ and the ways in which Christians can best engage in God’s mission of reconciliation provide the majority of the teaching and discussion content.

 

  Prerequisites: CHRM 101

  Elective Course

 

CHRM 321:
Principles of Church Planting

About this Course

This course surveys a wide variety of church planting models and strategies. Topics include: a theology of church-planting, demographic studies, leadership and team work, planning a church launch, church health, as well as key issues surrounding cross-cultural and multi-ethnic church planting efforts. There is an experiential learning component to this course.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

CHRM 331:
Pastoral Practices Seminar

About this Course

This course prepares students for the variety of practical roles and functions expected of church staff members. Subjects explored include the theology and practice of various church rituals, getting a good start in ministry, professional relationships in the ministry context, basic administration, and pastoral ethics, health and accountability.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

 

 

CHRM 351:
Children's Ministry - Creating & Understanding Culture

About this Course

This course will examine the leader's role in creating a culture, understanding contemporary culture, and changing a culture. In light of these, we will examine: the worldview and culture of a child and the implications this has for outreach and evangelism; the ‘relational’ culture of a child from family systems to anxiety and depression, and the affect these have on spiritual development; and the child in the Old Testament and New Testament, placing the child in the culture of the church.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

CHRM 352:
Children's Ministry Foundations

About this Course

In both leadership and Children’s Ministry certain theological and philosophical foundations must be understood to allow for effective gospel communication. This course will look at the building blocks for leadership and self-leadership. It will study the developmental and spiritual developmental stages of children. It will establish parents as the primary spiritual teachers for their children, and consider ministry to families. It will also study the Bible’s teaching on biblical discipline, applied both within the home and in the classroom.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

CHRM 353:
Cultivating Inner Life in Children's Ministry

About this Course

This course recognizes that the spiritual growth of those being served by a ministry/leader, is often reciprocal to the spiritual state of the leader themselves. Hence, we will consider the importance of paying attention to our relationship with Christ, creating space in our lives for worship and study, and cultivating rhythms for spiritual discipline. In turn we will examine the spiritual lives of children considering discipleship and worship, and conversion, baptism and communion, building upon the developmental stages from Course 2. We will also look at Children’s Ministry administration including vision, values, and objectives, as these directly relate to our spiritual disciplines development strategies for kids.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

CHRM 354:
Developing Others in Children's Ministry

About this Course

This course will consider the more tangible aspects of Children’s Ministry leadership: practicing exemplary leadership, mentoring and developing others, communication, authority, and conflict resolution. We will look at the practical side of Children’s Ministry programming from teaching and learning styles, to curriculum, to all things ‘volunteer.’

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

 

CHRM 421:
Spiritual Formation and Discernment

About this Course

This course integrates previous studies and experiences of formation in preparation for a life of discipleship, ministry and leadership. The course is taught from a multi-disciplinary perspective with a focus on developing an understanding of spiritual formation in the context of biblical theology, human development and contemporary culture. Course content and activities involve the pursuit of a healthy self-awareness, learning strategies to nurture a vital and growing life-long faith, developing mentoring skills, and vocational discernment.

 

  Prerequisites: 90 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

 

Down Arrow Educational Assistant (EDUA)

 

EDUA 121:
Child, Adolescent & Adult Development

About this Course

This course emphasizes the developmental characteristics of children through adolescence and into adulthood. The course also presents the developmental needs of children and adolescents with disabilities.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

EDUA 122:
Health & Wellness

About this Course

This course assists in understanding the role of a team member in supporting elementary school children with special needs in the classroom. The course focuses on the health and personal care needs of the child.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

EDUA 123:
Inclusion & Behaviour Management

About this Course

This course focuses on the design and strategies of positive behavioural supports that enhance and motivate student behavior in the classroom and in activities with teachers and peers. The course emphasizes managing the behaviours of children and adolescents with special needs seeking to meet the needs of diverse learners in today’s classrooms.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

EDUA 124:
Learning & Support Strategies (3 cr)

About this Course

This course presents a variety of learning and support strategies that can be applied in today’s classrooms. The course emphasizes ways to adapt the learning environment and scaffold learning tasks so children are successful in meeting their learning objectives.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

 

 

EDUA 125 (1 cr):
Interpersonal Communication - Group & Written

About this Course

This course assists in understanding the supportive role to children and adolescents’ communication needs. The course explores augmented and alternative modes of communication as well.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

EDUA 126 (1 cr):
Christian Worldview for Educational Assistants

About this Course

This course explores the concept of worldview in general and a Christian worldview in particular, as well as the implications of this worldview to the work of an Educational Assistant in the educational system.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

EDUA 127 (2 cr):
Professional Practice, Practium & Accountability

About this Course

This course is comprised of experiential learning in a supervised work environment as a Special Needs Educational Assistant (SEA) and Learning Educational Assistant (LEA) within the Elementary and Secondary School settings. The course also includes seminar sessions on the professional role of the Educational Assistant in the educational system.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

EDUA 128 (1 cr):
Community, Diversity, and Specialized Supports

About this Course

This course develops individual and community strategies to support the diverse needs of students with neurological disorders, such as autism.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in EA

  EA Course

 

 

Down Arrow Experiential Learning (EXPL)

 

EXPL 101, 102, 201, 202 (0.5 cr each):
Service Practicum (I, II, III, IV)

About this Course

This course combines volunteer experience with reporting, supervision, and evaluation. Service Practicum gives students opportunities to serve in the community, as part of a Christian lifestyle, in a practical learning experience related to their major or interest. (Alternate versions: EXPL 101 Q, 102 Q)

 

  Prerequisites: None for SP1. Passing grade required to move on to SP2, etc.

  Core Course

 

EXPL 233 (1 cr):
Costa Rica Practicum

About this Course

This course is a key experiential learning component for the Diploma in Applied Leadership curriculum. Students serve in the cross-cultural context of Costa Rica for 10 weeks in the Spring Semester.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 101, EXPL 102, LDRS 251

  Applied Leadership Course

 

EXPL 301/302/303/304
Internship

About this Course

The Internship experience provides students with hands-on ministry training, which is an integral part of the learning process at Columbia Bible College. Under an approved Supervisor, interns receive a total of 420 hours (105/credit hour) of on-the-field exposure, training and experience in a practical service assignment.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 202, LDRS 201, 60 hours college credit.

  Core Course

 

EXPL 311/312:
Cross-Cultural Internship (12 credits)

About this Course

This course is a key experiential learning component for the Intercultural Studies BA curriculum. Scheduled for the entire third year of the ICS program, students serve in a cross-cultural setting under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Students are expected to journal, reflect, and report on their experiences for personal and professional growth.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 202, LDRS 201, 60 hours college credits.

   ICS Course

 

 

EXPL 321/322:
Youth Ministry Internship (15 credits)

About this Course

This course is a key experiential learning component for the Youth Work BAPT curriculum. Scheduled for the entire third year of the YW program, students serve in a youth work setting under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Students are expected to journal, reflect, and report on their experiences for personal and professional growth.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 202, LDRS 201, 60 hours college credit

  Youth Work Course

 

EXPL 305/6:
Internship (Bible Teaching Minor)

About this Course

This Internship allows for hands-on teaching experience either on campus under the supervision of a Columbia faculty member or in the context of a Christian school under the supervision of a teacher or administrator. The school-based Internship requires a combination of EXPL 305/306 with the four credit EXPL 301-304 to allow for a total of 630 hours (105/credit hour) of practicum in a teaching environment. This course is specifically for students in the Bible Teaching Minor.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 202, LDRS 201, 60 hours college credit.

  Minor Course

 

 

Down Arrow Intercultural Studies (ICST)

 

ICST 251:
Intercultural Practicum

About this Course

This course cultivates cross-cultural ministry skills within a multi-cultural experience. The course clarifies the call to global mission, develops interpersonal skills and encourages commitment to sharing the love of Christ. This practicum is supervised by an on-site mentor.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in ICS Minor

  Minor Course

 

ICST 301:
Theology of Mission

About this Course

This course assists in understanding Christian mission from a biblical perspective and challenges toward involvement in Christian mission. The course views the biblical message as emphasizing mission and employs a missional hermeneutic to the Bible as a whole.

 

  Prerequisites: ICS Students - Completion of EXPL 311/312 | Non-ICS students - 60 hours college credit

  ICS Major/Elective Course

 

DS-ICST 321:
Intercultural Adaptation

About this Course

This course equips ICS interns to live and work effectively with people of a different cultural background. Within the context of intercultural differences, the course reflects on the challenges and dynamics of life and ministry in cross-cultural contexts. The course studies theoretical and practical examples of cross-cultural adaptation.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours credit in the ICS major | Co-requisite: EXPL 311/312

  ICS Major Course

 

DS-ICST 322:
Mission Contextualization

About this Course

This course addresses the process and principles of gospel contextualization, with special attention given to the intern’s specific cultural location. Every culture has its own worldview, values, practices and terms of reference. The ability to explain the good news of Jesus Christ across cultures in a way that can be readily heard and understood is of critical importance for anyone considering mission in an intercultural context.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours credit in the ICS major | Co-requisite: EXPL 311/312

  ICS Major Course

 

 

 

ICST 331:
Urban Mission

About this Course

This course creates an awareness of the contemporary urban situation and the role of the church within the city. Sociological insights, biblical/theological perspectives and ethical reflection are examined in an effort to understand urban development in light of the mission of the church. Students grapple with key issues confronting the church in its ministry in the urban context.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours of college credit

  Elective Course

 

ICST 411:
Mission Seminar

About this Course

This course offers fourth year Intercultural Studies students an opportunity to reflect missiologically upon their one year cross-cultural field placement experience. Theological, cultural, and interpersonal issues that may impact students considering further cross-cultural service are identified, discussed and addressed.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 311/312

  ICS Major Course

 

 

Down Arrow Outdoor Leadership (OUTL)

 

OUTL 103:
Emergency Rescue Technician I

About this Course

This course introduces and develops technical and operational skills common to a variety of emergency rescue technician career paths. Students are introduced to rescue operations through training and scenario based learning opportunities focusing on wilderness operations and travel, ground search and rescue, incident command system, hazardous environment management and personal safety.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132

  ERT Course

 

OUTL 104:
Emergency Rescue Technician II

About this Course

This course continues to develop the technical and operational skills introduced in OUTL 101 Emergency Rescue Technician 1. In this course students will be further introduced to rescue operations through training and scenario based learning opportunities focused on winter travel and safety, winter search and rescue, resort rescue operations, legal liability and risk management, occupational health and safety regulations, weather observation and forecasting, leadership, and group/team leadership dynamics.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132, OUTL 103, HKIN 141, HKIN 143

  ERT Course

 

 

Down Arrow Worship Arts (WORA)

 

WORA 101:
Theology of Worship

About this Course

This course introduces students to the theology of Christian Worship by exploring Scriptural themes such as formation, idolatry, creation, redemption and restoration, and forms and structures of worship. This course addresses both the gathered worship of the church and worship as the primary orientation of human life.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

WORS 121:
Introduction to Leading Worship

About this Course

This course explores various facets of worship leading in the Christian community. It enhances students’ abilities to serve effectively as worshipers and leaders of worship in today’s church.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

WORA 221:
Pastoral Worship Leadership

About this Course

This course explores various facets of worship leading in the Christian community. Special attention is given to discovering what it means to plan and lead worship both hospitably and pastorally. While a number of different worship forms are explored, this course emphasizes the leading of worship through musical expression.

 

  Prerequisites: WORA 121.

  Elective Course

 

WORA 241:
Sound & Media

About this Course

This course surveys basic knowledge and skills of sound and media. The course includes: sound system components, setup, signal flow, mixing, and signal processing as well as media software, stage management, professional etiquette, and the philosophy of sound and media.

 

  Prerequisites: None

   Elective Course

 

 

WORA 341:
Recording & Production Basics

About this Course

This course introduces students to audio recording through a hands-on look at the basic elements of contemporary recording techniques, including microphone techniques, tracking, editing, mixing, and mastering. There is an emphasis on critical listening and analysis, as well as discussion of music and musical form.

 

  Prerequisites: WORA 241

  Elective Course

 

WORA 401:
Worship Arts Senior Seminar

About this Course

This seminar course explores the connection between worship theology and worship praxis. Significant focus is given to a biblical theology of worship. As part of the course, students do in-depth, independent research in an area of worship theology, apply this to their practice, and teach a class on their chosen topic.

 

  Prerequisites: WORA 101, WORA 121, WORA 221 | Co-requisite: EXPL 301/2/3/4

  Worship Arts Course

 

 

Down Arrow Youth Work (YTHW)

 

YTHW 111:
Youth Work Essentials

About this Course

This course explores the capacities and competencies needed to become a youth worker. The course provides an understanding of the various components of youth work, both in the local church and in parachurch contexts. While the course has a theoretical foundation, it focuses on the practical skills and planning required for leadership of successful youth work.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

YTHW 121:
Youth Workers Conference (1 credit)

About this Course

This course explores and interacts with youth work themes presented at Columbia’s Youth Workers Conference. It includes conference participation and assignments based on conference material.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

YTHW 201:
Philosophy of Youth Work

About this Course

This course explores the question of why youth work is important. The course enables students to construct and articulate a biblical philosophy of youth work.

 

  Prerequisites: YTHW 111

  Elective Course

 

YTHW 221:
Middle School Youth Work (1 credit)

About this Course

This course explores early adolescent development and culture as a basis to understand the purpose and philosophy of working with middle school youth. Students gain practical experience in relating to early adolescents through participation in a weekend of ministry involvement.

 

  Prerequisites: YTHW 111

   Elective Course

 

 

YTHW 331:
Youth Issues

About this Course

This advanced course provides an understanding of the complex issues that teens face in society. The course develops biblically consistent strategies for responding to problems faced by teens, their parents, and society.

 

  Prerequisites: YTHW 201

  Elective Course

 

YTHW 421:
Vocational Youth Work

About this Course

This course offers fourth year Youth Work students an opportunity to reflect upon their internship experience and addresses the challenges of long term youth work. It outlines the vocational life stages in youth work and develops the skills needed to persevere.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 321/2 or EXPL 301/2/3/4

  Youth Work Course

 

 

General Studies

 

 

Down Arrow Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 201:
Cultural Anthropology

About this Course

This course introduces the anthropological study of various cultures including such topics as social belonging, kinship, gender relations, religion, art, sociolinguistics, economic relations and aspects of global cultural change. The course explores ways to understand the world views and beliefs of people in order to assist the student in living and working respectfully and effectively in different cultural contexts.

 

  Prerequisites: CHRM 101

  Elective  Course

 

ANTH 232:
World Religions

About this Course

This course will provide a comprehensive survey of five major world religions, each vastly different in its concerns, tenets and objectives. Understanding belief paradigms requires knowledge of the facts of religious history, beliefs and practices. In addition, this course will help students compare and contrast ideologies, identify current sources of religious tension, and sensitively build bridges with members of different faiths with the goal of impacting the world as peacemakers.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 160

  Elective Course

 

DS-ANTH 321:
Ethnography

About this Course

This course develops the method of qualitative research while living in a cross-cultural environment. Through the course, the student produces a written ethnographic account with cultural analysis of three anthropological subsystems from an emic perspective.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours credit in the ICS major, ANTH 201 | Corequisite: EXPL 311/312

  ICS Course

 

DS-ANTH 332:
World Religions Seminar

About this Course

This course studies the key elements, including beliefs and rituals, of the predominant religion practiced in the ICS intern’s cross-cultural location. Interns develop an understanding of what religion means and how religion functions in the life of individuals in the context. The course explores the way religions change and adapt themselves to new historical and geographical settings.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours credit in the ICS major, ANTH 232 | Co-requisite: EXPL 311/312

  ICS Course

 

 

Down Arrow Arts (ARTS)

 

ARTS 101:
Introduction to the Arts

About this Course

This course develops an understanding of artistic expression through an analysis and evaluation of various artistic forms throughout history. The course develops interpretive skills and creativity for meaningful involvement with the arts.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

ARTS 201:
Visual Arts

About this Course

This course introduces visual arts through a workshop format. The course develops a greater appreciation and understanding of art from the deeply engrained and rich history within Christianity. It highlights a perspective on how and why art can and should be used as a form of worship.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow Business (BUSI)

 

BUSI 101:
Introduction to Business

About this Course

This course introduces basic management and business administration concepts and skills. It provides the necessary skills required for administering in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. It also engages in real-world situations through game-based learning exercises.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

BUSI 221:
Essentials of Marketing

About this Course

This course surveys the function of marketing in the business context. Students investigate the foundational principles of marketing, including the role of marketing, branding, consumer sentiment, utility, market segmentation and demographics, and product development, from both a goods and services perspective. Retail and on-line formats for sales and distribution are discussed and inspected. Students engage in the development of a comprehensive marketing plan. Case studies are utilized in order to reinforce the underlying course objectives and provide real world examples.

 

  Prerequisites: BUSI 101

  Elective Course

 

BUSI 245:
Accounting

About this Course

This course introduces students to fundamental accounting principles and applications. The basic and expanded accounting equations serve as a framework for the course. Financial reports, including: the balance sheet, income statement; and statement of cash flows are both prepared and interpreted. Students will complete the entire accounting cycle by analyzing, documenting, recording and producing reports. Students will learn to interpret, categorize and document the various accounting categories (Assets, Liabilities, Owners Equity, Revenue and Expenses) and their respective accounts.

 

  Prerequisites: BUSI 101 or permission from instructor

  Elective Course

 

BUSI 304:
Non-Profit Organization Management

About this Course

This course introduces a wide range of tasks (e.g., vision building, planning, team-development, work organization, information management, budgeting) that are part of leadership in a non-profit organization. It explores leadership and organizational theories, management strategies, legal issues, and ethical considerations that are central to the work of non-profit organizations.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 201 and 60 hours college credit, or BUSI 221 and BUSI 245

  Elective Course

 

BUSI 350:
Entrepreneurial Operations

About this Course

This course is an integrative capstone class that examines and seeks to implement the elements necessary for the successful formation of a new ministry and/or small business. The intention is to utilize all the materials in previous studies in prerequisite courses to develop a complete business plan.

 

  Prerequisites: BUSI 221, BUSI 245, BUSI 304

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow Communication (COMM)

 

COMM 221:
Cross-Cultural Communication

About this Course

This course explores the intersection and mutual influence between culture and communication. The course considers the role of context (social, cultural and historical) in intercultural communication. The course provides practical tools for understanding oneself and others in order to increase competence in intercultural interactions.

 

  Prerequisites: IDIS 121 or IDIS 122

  Elective Course

 

COMM 331:
Effective Teaching

About this Course

This course examines the principles and methods of effective teaching. The course explores insights from educational psychology in conversation with biblical principles. It investigates the basics of educational theory, unit and lesson planning, evaluation, and classroom management. Opportunity is given for practical application both in and out of the classroom setting..

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

COMM 341:
Homiletics

About this Course

This course provides a theoretical and practical introduction to communication as oratory, particularly as practiced in Christian preaching contexts. The course introduces the structure of communication and rhetoric. Students have the opportunity to practice proficiency in persuasive and argument based speech focusing on the exposition of Christian Scripture.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit and RELS 211

  Core Course

 

DS-COMM 342:
Speaking to Youth

About this Course

This course improves a communicator’s skills with a youth audience by focusing on the content, delivery, and rhetorical methodology of a speech. The course provides opportunity to practice proficiency in persuasive and argument based speech to a youth audience. (This course is available to Youth Work Students in the midst of their internship year.)

 

  Prerequisites: 

  Elective Course

 

 

COMM 351:
Conflict Management

About this Course

This course surveys approaches to understanding and dealing with conflict. It provides a theoretical and biblical framework for communicating in interpersonal and small group conflict, as well as offers opportunities to learn and practice interpersonal communication skills.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

 

Down Arrow Economics (ECON)

 

ECON 101:
Principles of Macroeconomics

About this Course

This course serves as an introduction to macroeconomic issues such as growth, deflation and inflation, employment, government policies and intervention, as well as the impact of monetary policy and the role of the financial system. Students learn to comprehend and articulate the various positions surrounding current macroeconomic issues. Methods in calculating cumulative variables are used in order to understand, critique and evaluate economic policy.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow English (ENGL)

 

ENGL 099:
Writing for College

About this Course

This course provides the necessary English prerequisites needed for entry-level college writing and comprehension. This course reviews the basic skills of English grammar and mechanics, reading comprehension, academic writing, and academic research necessary for success in college or university courses.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Non-degree credit

 

ENGL 105:
Academic Writing

About this Course

This course explores the conventions of reading, writing, and research expected at a college-level. The course develops competence in critical reading and writing by analyzing the context, content, and form of compositions; by conducting and documenting academic research; and by writing a variety of academic compositions.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

ENGL 121:
English Literature

About this Course

This course introduces the fundamentals of literary study and the necessary skills to think and write critically about literature. Course topics include: the social function of English literature, its content and form, and the role of the reader in interpretation. The course develops the ability to do close reading through the recognition of genre, themes, and rhetorical methods.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

ENGL 233:
Creative Writing

About this Course

This course develops an understanding of creative writing practices in a number of genres through analysis and evaluation of examples and through student critique groups that provide feedback on and interaction with students’ own work. The course focuses on the practices necessary for successful writing, and the types of writing that can enrich the worship of a congregation. Genres explored include: creative non-fiction prose, poetry, short story, prayer, liturgy, drama, monologue, and the re-telling of story.

 

  Prerequisites: ENGL 105 or permission of instructor

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow Geography (GEOG)

 

GEOG 221:
Environmental Issues

About this Course

This course investigates the question of how humans should interact with and take care of the physical creation. The course explores the issue from a geographical perspective, as well as the larger philosophical and religious attitudes that have contributed to the present “crisis.” It develops a responsible Christian environmental ethic and application to global environmental issues.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

GEOG 231:
Introduction to Community Development and Transformation

About this Course

This course explores principles of local and international community development and draws upon the expertise of multiple organizations. Key areas of study include the evolution of development theory, factors underlying poverty and injustice, conflict and displacement, dependency, paternalism and sustainability. The course critically evaluates root causes of poverty and marginalization through a biblical lens and considers what solutions may exist.

 

  Prerequisites: 30 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow  Greek (GREE)

 

GREE 201:
New Testament Greek I

About this Course

This course introduces the basic features of New Testament Greek, including morphology, syntax, grammar, vocabulary (words occurring 50 times or more in the GNT) and oral reading. The result is the ability to read and translate simple sentences of the Greek New Testament with the aid of a Greek Lexicon.

 

  Prerequisites: 30 hours college credit

   Elective Course

 

GREE 202:
New Testament Greek II

About this Course

This course is a continuation of GREE 201 New Testament Greek I. The course completes the study of elementary grammar, morphology and syntax. It develops further vocabulary skills (words occurring 30 times or more in the GNT) and focuses attention on effective and accurate translation of extended passages of the Greek New Testament. The result is the ability to read longer portions of text with the aid of a Greek Lexicon.

 

  Prerequisites: GREE 201

  Elective Course

 

DS-GREE 311:
Intermediate Readings in New Testament Greek III

About this Course

This course builds upon the grammar, vocabulary and morphology of GREE 201 New Testament Greek I and GREE 202 New Testament Greek II. Students are exposed to longer narrative passages of the Greek New Testament that are written in a Semitic style (John, Mark, Revelation) with the goal of strengthening reading and exegetical skills. Vocabulary competence is honed to words occurring 20 times or more in the Greek New Testament.

 

  Prerequisites: GREE 202

  Elective Course

 

DS-GREE 312 :
Intermediate Readings in New Testament Greek IV

About this Course

This course increases competence in reading Koine Greek by reading and interpreting passages that are written in a more conversational (Philippians) and literary Koine Greek style (Hebrews, Acts, 1 Peter, Jude). Vocabulary competence is honed to words occurring 10 times or more in the Greek New Testament.

 

  Prerequisites: DS-GREE 311

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow Hebrew (HEBR)

 

HEBR 201:
Classical Hebrew I

About this Course

This course overviews biblical Hebrew starting with recognition of consonants and vowels and moving into simple translation of nouns, prepositions and the Qal verb pattern in the perfect inflection.

 

  Prerequisites: 30 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

HEBR 202:
Classical Hebrew II

About this Course

This course continues Hebrew I with its basic overview of biblical Hebrew. Students are introduced to the imperfect verb inflection and both strong and weak verbs in all seven Hebrew verb patterns. At the completion of the course, students are able, with the assistance of a Hebrew dictionary, to translate Hebrew narrative.

 

  Prerequisites: HEBR 201

  Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow History (HIST)

 

HIST 131:
Modern Western Civilization

About this Course

This course surveys the economic, religious, political, intellectual, and societal changes that have shaped the western world from the Early Modern period (1600) to the present.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

HIST 211:
History of Christianity

About this Course

This course surveys the history of Christianity from its inception through the contemporary era, identifying key leaders, events and forces that shaped this movement. The course analyzes the interaction between the religious, economic, political, sociological, aesthetic, and philosophical factors to produce this diverse historical movement.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 160

  Elective Course

HIST 221:
Anabaptist History & Thought

About this Course

This course examines the history and theology of the Anabaptist movement of the sixteenth century within the context of the Reformation and the larger history of the Christian church

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 160

  Core Course

 

 

Down Arrow  Human Kinetics (HKIN)

 

HKIN 101:
Introduction to Health & Fitness

About this Course

This course introduces primary topics within health and fitness. In addition to basic principles and science of proper exercise and nutrition, it addresses other aspects of physical wellbeing such as flexibility, posture, sleep and stress reduction. The course provides practical lessons on how to implement changes, enabling students to improve their own physical well-being in healthy, sustainable ways.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

HKIN 111:
Basketball

About this Course

This course develops athletic skills in basketball as well as interpersonal, service and leadership skills. The course supplements the learning of students on a Columbia basketball team.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

HKIN 115:
Volleyball

About this Course

This course develops athletic skills in volleyball as well as interpersonal, service and leadership skills. The course supplements the learning of students on a Columbia volleyball team.

 

  Prerequisites: 

  Elective Course

 

HKIN 125Q:
Introduction to Outdoor Adventure

About this Course

This course provides an experiential introduction to outdoor adventure including: canoeing, backpacking, rock climbing, sailing, caving, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing/snowboarding, winter camping, and emergency response. Focus is placed on basic skill development, recreation, and practical time outside. The course also provides a foundation for biblical stewardship of all God’s creation.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in Quest Program

  Quest Course

 

 

HKIN 132:
Emergency Medical Responder

About this Course

This course offers fundamental medical training for anyone entering the health care field focusing on developing the skills needed to respond to trauma and medical emergencies. Training also includes the fundamentals of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology and medical terminology.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in OL/ERT program

  OL/ERT Course

 

HKIN 142:
Rope Rescue Technician

About this Course

This course improves student’s rope handling and technical problem solving abilities. Throughout this course students will be responding as an organized rescue team to a series of incidents at various locations both day and night. Students will be technically challenged as they learn the skills necessary to affect a top-down, two-rope rescue efficiently and professionally. This course is broken into three modules: Topside Operations, Over the Edge Operations and Rope Team Leadership.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in OL/ERT program

  OL/ERT Course

 

HKIN 143:
Avalanche Safety Training

About this Course

This course combines the Avalanche Safety Training Level 1 and 2 certificates, developed by the Canadian Avalanche Center, in an expanded format including a 6 day introduction to wilderness touring. This course teaches the basics of the formation and nature of avalanches, avalanche terrain, and avalanche rescue. This course teaches students to use decision making frameworks, developed by avalanche professionals, to make key safety decisions for travel in avalanche terrain

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in OL/ERT program

  OL/ERT Course

 

HKIN 161:
ERT Skills Evaluation

About this Course

This course is a benchmark that ensures all students graduating with a certificate in Emergency Rescue Technician meet the basic industry standards/common practices for rescue operations. Students will have the opportunity to develop, plan and lead numerous full scale simulated emergency callouts. Students will be individually assessed to ensure competency in basic rescue operations.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132, OUTL 103, OUTL 104, HKIN 142, HKIN 143

  OL/ERT Course

 

 

HKIN 232:
Wilderness First Aid Bridge

About this Course

This course is the industry standard for outdoor professionals. It includes a review of all topics covered in Emergency Medical Responder plus numerous additional topics, case studies, patient assessment drills, and simulations with a wilderness focus. This course is for outdoor professionals and outdoor recreationalists who may have to care for an injured or ill patient for an extended period of time.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132

  OL/ERT Course

 

HKIN 243:
Rock Climbing

About this Course

This course enables students to gain experience and knowledge of safety procedures and principles of rock climbing including anchor-building techniques, advanced rope management skills, rappelling and belay systems, rescue fundamentals as well as route finding and lead climbing techniques. The course is under the leadership of Association of Canadian Mountain Guide (ACMG) instructors.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in OL program

  OL Course

 

HKIN 244:
Mountaineering

About this Course

This course builds a comprehensive foundation in all aspects of mountaineering in order to assist students develop the experience and skills required to become self-reliant in the mountains. The course covers snow and glacier travel, ice climbing, rock climbing, map and compass, mountain navigation, route planning, weather evaluation, hazard assessment and crevasse rescue techniques as well as summit objectives. The course is under the leadership of Association of Canadian Mountain Guide (ACMG) instructors.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in OL program

  OL Course

 

HKIN 251:
River Kayaking

About this Course

This course instructs boat design and outfitting, paddle design and fit, clothing options for kayaking in cold water, as well as safety equipment and its use. The course teaches basic river reading skills, how to perform a self-rescue and how to assist someone who is in the water. Also, the course emphasizes the skills to maneuver a kayak in a moving water environment using techniques such as the eddy turn, ferries, surfing and playing.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132, OUTL 103, OUTL 104, HKIN 142, HKIN 143

  OL Course

 

 

HKIN 252:
Ocean Kayaking

About this Course

This course introduces sea kayaking, as well as guiding and leadership in the industry. The course enables students to pursue employment and further training within the sea kayak guiding industry. In addition to paddling skills, topics covered are: ocean navigation, weather interpretation, rescue and incident response, equipment and clothing, trip planning and camping skills, judgment and group management.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132

  OL Course

 

HKIN 254:
Swiftwater Rescue Technician

About this Course

This comprehensive swiftwater course focuses on the safe work procedures that personnel should follow if they must enter moving water in the course of their work. The curriculum emphasizes hazard assessment, site safety, self-rescue, and a range of options for rescuing others, as well as the decision-making process required to choose the most appropriate rescue approach. The curriculum includes the advanced swimming skills required for self-rescue and rescue of others from more extreme whitewater, as well as high angle rope rescue skills that enable access to areas like canyons and gorges. The course also covers logistical, communications and safety considerations for operating in moving water in low visibility or darkness.

 

  Prerequisites: HKIN 132, OUTL 103, OUTL 104, HKIN 142, HKIN 143

  OL Course

 

 

Down Arrow  Interdisciplinary Studies (IDIS)

 

IDIS 099:
Academic Foundations

About this Course

This course provides the necessary prerequisite academic skills required for academic success at Columbia Bible College. (Non-degree credit)

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Non-degree credit, tuition is free

 

IDIS 121:
Effective Relationships

About this Course

This course introduces the interdisciplinary study of human relationships including insights from disciplines like psychology, sociology, and theology. The course explores relational health from a holistic perspective. While this course has a significant theoretical component, time is also directed toward practical and skill based learning.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

IDIS 122:
Marriage & Family

About this Course

This course introduces the study of families and intimate relationships including insights from disciplines like sociology, psychology, and theology. This course includes topics like the nature of family, gender, sexuality, love, relationship building, rituals, marriage, parenting, and divorce/remarriage. While this course has a significant theoretical component, it also provides practical elements to help students reflect on their own families of origin and their own relational contexts.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Core Course

 

IDIS 123Q:
Christian Decision Making

About this Course

This course explores a biblical and psychological framework for decision making. It will combine an overview of God’s guidance in both the Old and New Testament with an understanding of the basic psychological factors at work when exercising discernment. The course is purposed to provide a functional framework for decision making for major life decisions, as well as, navigating daily life choices as a disciple of Christ.

 

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in Quest program

   Quest Course

 

 

IDIS 313:
Biblical Backgrounds

About this Course

This course introduces the historical, geographical, political, and religious settings of the ancient Near East and the Second Temple Period as they relate to both the Old and New Testaments. This course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach (literary, historical, sociological) to explore the background contexts upon which the biblical literature is set.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 211, 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

IDIS 321:
Foundations of Soul Care

About this Course

This course introduces both theory and tools necessary to foster psycho-spiritual growth and health of the whole person, emphasizing particular attention to their inner lives. Foundational knowledge of the principles of prayer ministry and spiritual direction practices are considered as tools to assist people to overcome barriers and inner life wounds. Use of these principles and practices will bring support, restoration, and well-being to persons who seek deeper knowledge of God and self. This course is experiential and will include large and small group work, personal reflection, dialogue and a variety of prayer experiences.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

IDIS 331:
Christian Classics & Thought

About this Course

This course studies a number of classic texts that have been influential in the history of Christian thought and spirituality. The course explores these classics in the context of disciplines like history, English, and theology. Literature from a wide range of traditions, time periods, and genres will be examined.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

IDIS 371:
Theology Through the Arts

About this Course

This course demonstrates how Christian doctrine is explored and expressed through the arts. The course surveys how theology has been communicated in an artistic way throughout history. It helps students cultivate analytical skills, and evaluate the theological themes found in the arts.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

   Elective Course

 

 

IDIS 373:
Film, Faith & Culture

About this Course

This course engages students in a dialogue between the Christian faith and contemporary culture through the medium of film. The course examines religious themes, portrayals of Christ and Christians, and the various ways that film depict the human condition. The course analyzes and evaluates films from various genres.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Elective course

 

IDIS 374:
Rock, Faith & Pop Culture

About this Course

This course engages students in a dialogue between the Christian faith and contemporary culture through the medium of rock music. The course traces the historical development of rock ‘n’ roll from its birth in the 1950s until today. It examines how rock music has shaped and reflected popular culture, helps students cultivate critical listening skills, and analyzes as well as evaluates the dominant themes found in rock music.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Elective course

 

 

Down Arrow  Leadership Studies (LDRS)

 

LDRS 111/111Q:
Self-Management

About this Course

This course explores personal awareness, development and management of self through the lenses of practical theology and leadership theory. Emphasis is placed on strengthening character, building habits, establishing personal direction, discovering personal uniqueness, and ultimately leading as a wise steward of personal gifts and abilities.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

LDRS 201:
Introduction to Leadership Studies

About this Course

This course introduces leadership studies in three areas: leader development (self-awareness and leadership ethics), leadership education (an understanding of leadership), and leadership training (leadership skills and competencies). Primary competencies that are explored include working with teams, bringing about change, sustaining effectiveness, and using strengths. The course assists students in making a difference in the church and community.

 

  Prerequisites: 30 hours college credit

  Core Course

 

LDRS 203:
Theology of Leadership

About this Course

This course assists students to develop and articulate a biblically based theology of Christian leadership and its application in the church and the community.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 201 or 30 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

LDRS 232:
Leadership & Team-building

About this Course

This course explores team development and effectiveness in a variety of settings. The course also introduces conflict management theory and communications strategies in the context of a team.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 201 or 30 hours college credit

   Elective Course

 

 

LDRS 251:
Leadership & Culture

About this Course

This course explores the complexities of culture, and how leadership is both affected by, and can have effect on, culture. The course examines cultural dimensions, characteristics of effective global leaders, and how to bring about change in a cross-cultural setting.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 201 or 30 hours college credit

  Elective course

 

LDRS 252:
Costa Rica Leadership Experience

About this Course

This course is a key experiential learning component for the Diploma in Applied Leadership curriculum. Students serve in the cross-cultural context of Costa Rica for 10 weeks in the Spring Semester.

 

  Prerequisites: EXPL 101, EXPL 102, LDRS 251

  Applied Leadership Course

 

LDRS 299:
e-Portfoio Design

About this Course

This course engages students in the development of an electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio); an electronic collection of evidence that shows one’s learning journey over time. This e-Portfolio will serve both as an assessment of student’s understanding of key lessons taught throughout Applied Leadership classes, as well as a practical resume addendum . (0 credit grad requirement).

 

This course should be taken at the end of Year 2/or in the final semester of the diploma program.

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in Applied Leadership, 45 hours college credit.

  Applied Leadreship Course

 

LDRS 311:
Leadership Sustainability

About this Course

This course explores personal and organizational sustainability for authentic transformational servant leadership. Understanding burnout as a significant risk, participants will interact with, study, and apply various dimensions of self-care and sustainability from both theological and psychological perspectives.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 111 and LDRS 201, or 60 hours college credit

   Elective Course

 

 

LDRS 321:
Risk Management & Legal Liability

About this Course

This course introduces the legal and safety issues related to providing recreational services to individuals at retreat camps, youth groups and adventure programming. The course reviews the relevant legal concepts that affect providers of recreational programs as well as focuses on risk management planning.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 201

  Elective course

 

LDRS 332:
Organizational Behaviour

About this Course

This course explores the structure, culture, and dynamics of organizations and the subsequent challenges generated in organizational situations. Students will explore organizational theory, and examine practical methods regarding the aspects of organizational culture, growth, change, while acknowledging personal and individual behavior within the organizational context.

 

  Prerequisites: LDRS 232 or 60 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

LDRS 334:
Empowering Leadership

About this Course

This course explores the role of influence, and the ability to develop others within the practice of leadership. A variety of relational models, such as coaching, mentoring, and spiritual directing, are considered in detail.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level LDRS classes or 90 hours college credit.

  Elective Course

 

LDRS 391:
Leadership Seminar

About this Course

This course explores the current leadership issues that have relevance for not-for-profit and business sectors. The course introduces a variety of leaders to participants with opportunity for real-time engagement and interaction.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 300-level LDRS classes

   Elective Course

 

 

LDRS 401:
Applied Leadership Capstone

About this Course

This self-directed course provides students the opportunity to create a professional portfolio, serving as a culminating project of the Applied Leadership degree. Students utilize the capstone to demonstrate their learning and application of leadership understanding and skills, and present the final project in preparation for work post-graduation.

 

This course shoudl be taken in final year, preferably final semester.

  Prerequisites: Enrollment in Applied Leadership degree and 90 hours college credit

   Applied Leadership Course

 

 

Down Arrow Linguistic Studies (LING)

LING 221:
Introduction to TESOL

About this Course

This course introduces the basic theories of teaching English as a Second Language. It develops skills and techniques for effective ESL/EFL teachers. The course investigates the aims, principles and methods of ESL/EFL education as well as explores second language acquisition. It demonstrates how to incorporate Christian values within the ESL/EFL profession.

 

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Elective  Course

 

 

Down Arrow  MUSIC (Music)

 

MUSI 111:
Contemporary Music Theory I

About this Course

This course is a study of rhythm, scales, intervals, triads and cadences followed by the principles of harmony, key transposition and modulation.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective course

 

MUSI 121:
Keyboard Lab I

About this Course

This course develops keyboard skills and theory through private instruction and is taken in the same semester as Contemporary Music Theory I. The course applies the content covered in Contemporary Music Theory I to the keyboard.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 131:
Guitar Lessons

About this Course

This course consists of private instruction in guitar. Focus includes exploration of mechanics and fundamentals of guitar and the development of a repertoire of 2-4 songs, depending on student ability and interest.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 132:
Piano Lessons

About this Course

This course consists of private instruction in piano. Focus includes exploration of mechanics and fundamentals of piano, and the development of a repertoire of 2-4 songs, depending on student ability and interest.

 

  Prerequisites: None

   Elective Course

 

 

MUSI 133:
Voice Lessons

About this Course

This course consists of private instruction in voice. Focus includes exploration of mechanics and fundamentals of voice, and the development of a repertoire of 2-4 songs, depending on student ability and interest.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 142:
Guitar Ensemble

About this Course

This course provides group instruction in guitar—learning classical methods that allow students to play as a quartet or quintet. Content is dependent on the students’ interest and level of expertise.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 143:
Vocal Ensemble

About this Course

This course provides group instruction in choral voice—learning vocal warm-ups, sight singing techniques, and singing methods that allow students to sing together chorally. Content is dependent on the students’ interest and level of expertise.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 151:
Worship Ensemble

About this Course

This course provides opportunity to develop musical and ministry skills as part of a worship ministry team that serves primarily off campus on 15-18 occasions during the school year. The ensemble of up to 20 singers and instrumentalists learns and presents a wide range of music within the church and performance contexts.

 

  Prerequisites: Member of Travelling Ministry Team

   TMT Course

 

 

MUSI 211:
Contemporary Music Theory II

About this Course

This course explores scales, with the introduction of modes and the Blues scale. It explores harmony through diatonic sevenths chords and chords of secondary function. The course introduces the “Nashville Number System,” developing chord charts and song analysis.

 

  Prerequisites: MUSI 111 and MUSI 121 or Challenge Exams

  Elective course

 

MUSI 221:
Keyboard Lab II

About this Course

This course develops keyboard skills and theory through private instruction and is taken in the same semester as Contemporary Music Theory II. The course applies the content covered in Contemporary Music Theory II to the keyboard.

 

  Prerequisites: MUSI 111 and MUSI 121 OR Challenge Examples 

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 311:
Contemporary Music Theory III

About this Course

Continuing from MUSI 211 Contemporary Music Theory II, this course explores chord structure, melody, and form in contemporary music and emphasizes ear training in contemporary idioms. Using the building blocks of MUSI 211, this course focuses on skills in arranging and analyzing songs for a band in a wide variety of contemporary styles. Course topics include: writing lead sheets, vocal harmonies and background harmonies, writing for rhythm sections and instrumental sections, and single line counter-melodies.

 

  Prerequisites: MUSI 211 and MUSI 221 or Challenge Exams.

  Elective Course

 

MUSI 312:
Music Arranging

About this Course

This course develops the ability to arrange music by teaching principles for original composition and arrangement of a wider variety of instrumentation. The course covers a variety of musical styles, forms, and techniques and requires student focus on worship band, choral or instrumental arrangement in order to produce a piece of significant merit. Students have the opportunity to pursue a specific composition interest in one of these areas, and workshop their composition in class. Depending on student strengths and interest, further topics may include: orchestration for winds/strings/brasses/percussion, instrumental writing techniques, as well as choral styles and voicing.

 

  Prerequisites: MUSI 211 and MUS 221

   Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow  Philosophy (PHIL)

 

PHIL 231:
Ethical Reasoning

About this Course

This course investigates and creates theories about the nature of right and wrong, duty, obligation, freedom, virtue, and similar issues facing humanity. The course examines both Moral Philosophy and Christian Ethics as part of the investigation. The course applies some of the historical and contemporary moral theories to current ethical issues our society and churches are facing.

 

  Prerequisites: RELS 160

  Core  Course

 

 

Down Arrow  Psychology (PSYC)

 

PSYC 101:
Introduction to Psychology I

About this Course

This course introduces the following major areas within psychology: history, main perspectives, research methods, biopsychology, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, human development, and gender. The introduction focuses on current research as well as long standing concepts and theories.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective course

 

PSYC 102:
Introduction to Psychology II

About this Course

This course introduces the following major areas within psychology: cognition, language, intelligence, health, human sexuality, motivation, emotion, personality, abnormal therapy, social, culture, and ethnicity. The introduction focuses on current research as well as long-standing concepts and theories..

 

  Prerequisites: 30 hours college credit

  Elective Course

 

PSYC 223:
Lifespan Development

About this Course

This course introduces students to the study of human development across the lifespan. Major theories of biological, cognitive, social and emotional development from infancy, adolescence, and adulthood are surveyed.

 

  Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 102

  Elective Course

 

PSYC 202:
Research Methods

About this Course

This course introduces the procedures used in social science research along with the logic underlying them. Experimental, correlational and observational approaches are considered. Topics include strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, the formulation of testable questions, the control of extraneous influences and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence. Students gain hands-on experience evaluating research and conducting and writing up several small research projects.

 

  Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 102

  Elective course

 

PSYC 231:
Basic Counselling Skills

About this Course

This course explores theoretical and practical knowledge foundational to individual counselling. It facilitates experiential learning with a core set of counselling skills that includes attending, active empathic listening, empathic responding, probing, summarizing appropriate use of questions, and strength based challenging. It focuses on important counselling values, such as respect, empathy, genuineness, and appreciation of diversity and introduces important ethical issues within counselling psychology.

 

  Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 102 or 30 hours college credit

   Elective Course

 

PSYC 252:
Social Psychology

About this Course

This course introduces key theories of social psychology and their social contexts, highlighting the relationship between the individual and society. Key aspects such as attitudes, goals, values, group memberships, self and identity, culture and personality are examined.

 

  Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 102

  Elective Course

 

PSYC 303:
Introduction to Statistics

About this Course

This course examines the logic and application of data and analysis techniques suitable for the behavioural sciences. Major topics include descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, correlation and regression, and selected non-parametric methods.

 

  Prerequisites: PSYC 202

  Elective Course

 

PSYC 311:
Theories of Personality

About this Course

This course examines the major theories of personality in the field of psychology. It follows the classic approach to personality, starting with an exploration of Freud’s psychoanalytic theory and working forward to contemporary conceptualizations of personality. Working within this framework the course also incorporates an exploration of current personality research.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level PSYC classes

   Elective Course

 

PSYC 312:
Abnormal Psychology

About this Course

This course surveys the subject of abnormal behavior with an emphasis on a scientific approach to understanding its origins, maintenance and treatment. It examines the history and scope of abnormal behavior as well as contemporary definitions and current diagnostic criteria for the major disorders. Students apply and develop critical thinking skills related to theories and treatments for each disorder.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level PSYC classes

  Elective Course

 

PSYC 331:
Theories of Counselling

About this Course

This course introduces the major contemporary approaches to counselling and psychotherapy. It includes a thorough examination of the main concepts, therapeutic processes, and change mechanisms forwarded within each approach. The course reviews research evidence regarding the approaches’ applicability and effectiveness and provides brief overviews of their history and models of personality. Lastly, the course examines an integrative model of psychotherapy and invites students to examine the central assumptions underlying different approaches to counselling and psychotherapy.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level PSYC classes

  Elective Course

 

PSYC 351:
Brain & Behaviour

About this Course

This course explores the biological basis for human behaviour by examining the elements of the nervous system as well as the specific systems responsible for sensation, perception, motor control, emotions, learning and memory. Other topics include neurological disorders, developmental neuroscience, neurobiology, and the brain’s role in health and sickness, violence, and psychopathology.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level PSYC classes

   Quest Course

 

PSYC 431:
Integration of Faith and Psychology

About this Course

This course considers the relationship between psychology and Christian theology. It provides students with opportunities to explore the concepts and meanings that each utilizes to understand the human condition. The course invites reflection on multiple levels beginning with foundational philosophical assumptions (i.e. ontological, epistemological, and axiological) before considering specific knowledge claims and practical applications drawn from them. It considers convergent and divergent meanings while facilitating each student’s integrative efforts.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level PSYC classes

   Elective Course

 

PSYC 453:
Learning Psychology

About this Course

This course examines major theories related to motivation, evaluation, developmental stages, individual differences and the processes related to learning. Key aspects include disordered learning and the education/treatment approaches to assist those requiring accommodated learning.

 

  Prerequisites: 6 hours 200-level PSYC classes and 90 hours college credit

   Elective Course

 

 

Down Arrow Sociology (SOCI)

DS-SOCI-303:
Youth Culture

About this Course

This course explores the current trends and issues prevalent in youth culture so that students may effectively interact and function within that culture. This course is available to Youth Work Students during the internship year.

 

Taken during youth ministry internship

  Prerequisites: 60 hours college credit

  Youth Work Course

 

 

Down Arrow Theatre (THTR)

THTR 101:
Introduction to Theatre

About this Course

This course introduces the basic components of theatre. It explores the theatrical elements of voice, movement, characterization and improvisation, both theoretically and experientially. It also explores various roles and positions within theatre and how they contribute to meaning. The course develops the tools needed to successfully take a story, scripture or script and produce it on stage.

 

  Prerequisites: None

  Elective  Course

 

Academic Calendar

Fall 2019 Semester

AUGUST  
1-15 Financial Registration for Fall Semester
15 Fall Semester Payment Due Date
SEPTEMBER  
Sept 1-2 New and Returning Student Orientation
3 Day and Evening Classes Begin
3-9 Course Add/Drop Week
10 75% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
24 50% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
OCTOBER  
8 0% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
12-15 Thanksgiving Break (no day or evening classes)
16-22 Mid-term Exams (classes continue)
NOVEMBER  
4 Last Day for Withdrawal without Academic Penalty
4 Pre-Registration for Winter Semester Starts
7-11 Remembrance Day Break (no day or evening classes)
15 Final Payment Due for Payment Plan
DECEMBER  
5 Last Day of Classes
6-12 Final Exam Week
9-12 Financial Registration for Winter Semester
12 Winter Semester Payment Due Date
13 - January 4 Christmas Break (Residence Closed)

Winter 2020 Semester

JANUARY  
5 New Student Orientation
6 Day & Evening Classes Begin
6-12 Course Add/Drop Week
13 75% Refund for Withdrawals Starts
27 50% Refund for Withdrawals Starts
FEBRUARY  
10 0% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
17 Family Day Holiday (no day or evening classes)
18-21 Mid-term Exams (classes continue)
22-Mar 1 Reading Week (no day or evening classes)
MARCH  
9 Last Day for Withdrawal from Classes Without Academic Penalty
9 Pre-Registration for Fall Semester Starts
15 Final Payment Due for Payment Plan
APRIL  
9 Last Day of Classes
10 Good Friday (no day or evening classes)
13 Easter Monday (no day or evening classes
14-17 Final Exams
 18 Commencement Ceremony & Banquet

Spring/Summer 2020 Semester

APRIL  
17 Spring Semester Payment Due Date
20 Spring Classes Begin
   

 

2020-2021 Calendar (Tentative)

Fall 2020 Semester

AUGUST  
1-14 Financial Registration for Fall Semester
14 Fall Semester Payment Due Date
SEPTEMBER  
Sept 6-7 New and Returning Student Orientation
8 Day and Evening Classes Begin
8-14 Course Add/Drop Week
15 75% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
29 50% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
OCTOBER  
13 0% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
10-13 Thanksgiving Break (no day or evening classes)
20-26 Mid-term Exams (classes continue)
NOVEMBER  
9 Last Day for Withdrawal without Academic Penalty
9 Pre-Registration for Winter Semester Starts
11-15 Remembrance Day Break (no day or evening classes)
15 Final Payment Due for Payment Plan
DECEMBER  
10 Last Day of Classes
11-17 Final Exam Week
14-17 Financial Registration for Winter Semester
17 Winter Semester Payment Due Date
18 - January 9 Christmas Break (Residence Closed)

Winter 2021 Semester

JANUARY  
10 New Student Orientation
11 Day & Evening Classes Begin
11-17 Course Add/Drop Week
18 75% Refund for Withdrawals Starts
FEBRUARY  
1 50% Refund for Withdrawals Starts
15 0% Refund for Withdrawal Starts
15 Family Day Holiday (no day or evening classes)
22-26 Mid-term Exams (classes continue)
27-Mar 7 Reading Week (no day or evening classes)
MARCH  
15 Last Day for Withdrawal from Classes Without Academic Penalty
15 Pre-Registration for Fall Semester Starts
15 Final Payment Due for Payment Plan
APRIL  
2 Good Friday (no day or evening classes)
5 Easter Monday (no day or evening classes)
16 Lasta day of classes
19-22 Final Exams
24 Commencement Ceremony & Banquet
   

Spring/Summer 2021 Semester

APRIL  
22 Spring Semester Payment Due Date
26 Spring Classes Begin